Jixiang Chinese Symbols

Jixiang Chinese Symbols

Jixiang(Chinese: ¼ªÏé) Chinese Symbols revolve around good fortune, and positive elements. Ji means something good and beneficial, and Xiang means an auspicious sign. It is the Chinese belief that by filling our lives with lucky objects and images, they increase prosperity and happy circumstances, making our existence joyful and fulfilling. Therefore, Jixiang Chinese Symbols are accepted by all ranks of people and enjoy a never-fading popularity. They can be seen everywhere at architectures, gardens, costumes, paper-cuts or parks for the people ranging from imperial to commoners.

 

Emblems of good fortune, luck and strength can be used to enhance all areas of your life. So the inspirations of Jixiang designs range from imagery of people, animals, flowers, birds and wares to auspicious Chinese characters, proverbs, benedictions and fairy tales, and the techniques of expression include metaphor, analogy, pun, symbol and euphony. A single pattern often contains a benediction for happiness or longevity, and can be seen in people¡¯s everyday life as well as on jubilant occasions.

 

To Chinese people, the Jixiang Chinese Symbols such as the dragon, phoenix, turtle, Qilin( Chinese: ÷è÷ë), lion and white crane are auspicious and benevolent. The turtle and white crane symbolized longevity in ancient China; hence, the saying:¡°the white crane lives a thousand years and the turtle ten thousand years¡±.¡°A Couple of Phoenix Singing in Harmony¡±are always seen at weddings as a wish for happiness in the couple¡¯s marriage.

 

These Jixiang Chinese Symbols can be embroidered to show our vitality, and express acceptance of luck and fortune into our life. Jixiang Chinese Symbols have graced our architecture, language, artwork, and everyday objects for centuries. Lucky images and symbols are used to create an environment protected from illness, bad fortune and mishaps.

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